Pedometers

2017 Pedometer Program Recap

This year, we got kids to become more physically active through yet another successful Step It Up pedometer program. We worked with two schools and one community-based organization, and provided students and teachers with 200 pedometers this year.

Throughout Step It Up, we have spoken to a student, teachers, and a social worker about their experiences, and found that pedometers more than increased physical activity among participants. Step It Up helped students become more competitive, learn about goal-setting, and encouraged students to collaborate with each other to work as a team.

We would also like to give a huge thanks to the everyone who participated and supportedStep It Up. Thanks to you, we are one step closer to getting more kids moving and forming healthy habits.

We spoke to some of the teachers and students from the program and here is what they had to say about Step It Up:

The pedometers are a great tool for students to use...This day and age, it’s crucial to have integration of technology with fitness...The pedometers are great to bring into any physical education or health class to jumpstart fitness, especially for students who are apprehensive about working out in groups because they’re embarrassed or nervous. When it’s just them, alone, and the pedometer, they don’t have any hold-ups. They can just go out and do it.
— Eric Seely, teacher at Achievement First University Prep High School
Some of the students did a family thing. They got their sister or brother involved to walk with them when they were getting their steps.
— Steve Lieberman, teacher at EPIC High School
Because they were working so closely together for the pedometer program, they had to work together...to get them out of their funk and [that] made their relationship stronger.
— Lucas Slattery, social worker at Boys Hope Girls Hope
The pedometers motivated me to be a lot more fit and be active in my life...Instead of exercising just once a week, I upped it to three and then to four times a week, to meet the steps, I decided to run more... I definitely saw how effective the pedometers were.
— Jabari Boss, 12th grade student at Achievement First University Prep High School

Wearable Tech and Meaningful Changes in Health

Recently, our blog posts have discussed the role of technology in children’s lives today - specifically, smartphones and Internet safety. At CHIL, we’re also working with students to incorporate technology into their physical activity via our pedometer program.

 

“Wearable technology” like Fitbits and Apple Watches have exploded in popularity in recent years. Their popularity especially among students has inspired several extensive studies into the effectiveness of such devices for goals like weight loss. These studies have been published in influential publications like the Journal of the American Medical Association, suggesting their importance and relevance today. Many of these studies showed mixed results in the effect of having a Fitbit-like device on weight loss over time.

 

But it’s important to remember that while weight loss is potentially an easy, objective measure for researchers, it is not the only potential health benefit that comes from tracking day-to-day activity. It’s also not the only goal that students should have for themselves. Simply tracking physical activity can be a huge help for those who need to increase their daily activity levels - and that applies to many of us, and to students as well. Despite the federal recommendation that teens get at least one hour of exercise (moderate or rigorous) each day, 2012 data showed that only one in four teens get that hour, according to an article recently published by NPR.  The  Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) also reports that nearly half of American youths aged 12-21 years are not vigorously active on a regular basis.

 

Another article in NPR weighs some of the factors that could influence the effectiveness of wearable technology for fitness or activity. For example, while meeting daily fitness goals and step counts (the popular “10K a day”) could really motivate one person, failing to meet the same goal could discourage another from continuing to wear the device altogether. Also, meeting a daily goal could actually cause a person to “reward” him/herself with more calories. How, then, can we make these gadgets more effective? According to Dr. Mitesh Patel, who was interviewed in the NPR article, these devices are basically most effective when the people using them are “already dedicated to tracking their fitness.” Beyond the initial cost of an expensive device, there has to be a motivator that continues after the novelty of the gadget wears off.


What does this mean for students who are using less-pricey tools like those in our pedometer programs? These students can probably derive most of their long-term motivation not from the promise of weight loss but from the support they get from their school, friends, and family to be more active. The CDC agrees, pointing out that “well designed school-based interventions” and “social support from family and friends” are key in increasing physical activity for all teens. Our pedometer program seeks to do just that. For more information about our pedometer program, please click here.

Social Incentives for a Healthy Lifestyle

 

A recent article in the New England Journal of Medicine argues that the infrastructure to harness healthy habits already exists within our social interactions. The support from friends and families can help us make healthy decisions on a daily basis. The article outlines five rungs of social incentives used to improve patients’ health and to test their effectiveness. Here is a short description of each of the rungs illustrated in the article:

 

Rung One: “Patients have no explicit social engagement.”

Since health is at once a public and a private matter, some of our most important daily health maintenance routines are invisible to the world. The authors point out that our health can be invisible even to us - without a pedometer, we don’t have a grasp of our daily activity. Realizing the correlation between self-awareness and developing healthy habits, CHIL has partnered with New York City schools to bring pedometers to students. Read more about our pedometer program.

 

Rung Two: Patients’ activities, outcomes, or goals are visible to others.”

In order to encourage healthy behavior, you and your family can physically partake in habits, such as taking daily medications and vitamins, in a visible place. Restaurants have started to use this model to promote handwashing by moving the sink out of the bathroom and into a more public space.

 

Rung Three: External support is explicitly established.”

Signing up for external support, such as text alerts, to remind you and your kids to exercise can increase healthy outcomes. For everyday challenges, such as lowering blood sugar levels, simple interventions like weekly phone calls with a mentor can be more effective than expensive drugs.

 

Rung Four: “Interventions leverage reciprocity.”

It’s all about being committed to a friend’s goals as well as your own regardless of your age. Even physicians are known to work in teams to competitively improve outcomes. This element of competition can certainly energize patients combatting chronic diseases such as diabetes.

 

Rung Five:Reputational or economic incentives are layered on top of social commitments.”

This is the ultimate goal in the five-rung model. Individuals and teams can work together to create leaderboards and competitions. By doing so, there can be an increased sense of accountability as people work together toward a reward. Patients have greater potential to succeed if teammates know each other beforehand and are introduced to incentives together.