Infants

As Flu Season Continues, Symptoms to Look Out For

Many news outlets are reporting that this year’s flu season is one of the worst in recent years. It is widespread and has tragically proven fatal for dozens of children. Those of us in CHIL who work at children’s hospitals have definitely seen emergency departments swell with flu patients the past few weeks, and doctors warn that the flu may remain a major problem for some time.

 

Since 2018, it may seem difficult to believe that the flu could still be so lethal. However, it is true that children, especially ones who already have chronic health conditions, are at risk. Media outlets like the New York Times have assembled lists of symptoms to look out for in children that could signal the need to seek medical care right away. The most common causes of complications from the flu include pneumonia, sepsis, and dehydration. Warning signs that a child may need immediate medical attention include: a fever that goes away only to return, confusion, extreme pain, severe vomiting, and a tinted blue color to the skin.

 

Of course, most cases of the flu are less serious than these, and healthy children can usually get over them with medication, proper rest, and hydration. However, the article says that some doctors still recommend the flu vaccine at this point, since there are at least “several weeks” left in the season.

 

The article in the New York Times referenced here gives important information, but what was also insightful was the comment section for this piece. Quite a few comments touched on some several themes, including the importance of vaccination (and the consequences of refusing it for a child), as well as socioeconomic factors that may increase a child’s risk factors for severe flu. However, many readers agreed with the theme of the article — we need to balance finding prompt care for sick children while avoiding overcrowded emergency rooms. If emergency rooms are overwhelmed, less timely care is available for everyone. Questions that remain unanswered by this sort of advice should probably be directed to a child’s pediatrician or primary care provider.  




 

 


 

Mindfulness - Something for Everyone

The timing couldn’t be better - not long after our recent post on ways to be in the present, the New York Times published a piece on “Mindfuless for Children.” The author defines mindfulness as “the simple practice of bringing a gentle, accepting attitude to the present moment,” and argues that even the youngest children can benefit from this approach.

 

The graphics in this article are beautiful and worth checking out, but we’ve condensed some of the main points here:

 

Mindfulness starts young. Even infants can notice the difference between a stressed, distracted parent and a smiling, “present” parent. Mindfulness experts say that eye contact is important to establish a connection between an infant and a parent; unfortunately, smartphones have become a huge distraction in establishing that connection. Experts recommend putting down the phone, however briefly, to interact with infants. The same goes for raising toddlers - as they start to learn to express themselves, helping them identify and describe their feelings is very important.

 

Mindfulness is important throughout childhood, from infancy to early childhood to teenage years. The appearance of mindfulness can evolve. For example, a focus on gratitude and recognizing happy moments for young children evolves to a focus on healthy interpersonal relationships in teenage years. A surprising number of diverse factors are involved in mindfulness. For example, increase in movement and activity relieves stress and improves physical health for guardians and children alike.


Mindfulness can’t be “outsourced.” People who work with children and teens to bring mindfulness into their lives emphasize the key role parents and guardians can have in contributing to children’s health. Mindfulness “isn’t like piano lessons,” where parents can simply drop off their kids to get their weekly lesson. The author of the article concedes that parenting is hard work, and often very stressful, but they are the main figures in their children’s young lives. Caregivers don’t have to be expert meditators; instead, they can focus on things like forgiveness and appreciation of the present along with their children. Having this approach will have positive mental health impacts for everyone involved.