Findings

Friends for Life - They're Lifesaving

A quick Google search on friendships and its correlation to health results in many articles concerning the elderly, but a new study has focused on studying teens, for whom the conversation around mental health is especially important. Child Development recently found that close friends among adolescents can have lasting mental health benefits, which can be carried into adulthood, according to NPR.

 

The study, conducted over 10 years, followed 169 15-year-olds until they were 25-years-old. At age 15 and 16, researchers asked participants to record conversations with their friends. Teenage friends discussed the importance and level of trust and communication that was in their relationship at the time. Then, the participants completed annual surveys about their levels of anxiety and self-worth.

 

Researchers found that after 10 years, teenagers with strong, close friendships were more likely to report an improvement in anxiety and self-worth at age 25 than adults who did not have strong emotional links to their friends as teenagers. Stable friendships - especially same pairs of friends who showed up together year after year - seemed to provide participants with the greatest mental health gains.

 

The implications are fairly strong here. Teenagers who find support among each other are more likely to be able to weather challenges that they may face, according to the authors of the study. They also learn how to maintain close, important relationships from a young age, which lays the foundation for future healthy relationships.

 

At CHIL, our projects encourage friends to engage with each other as they participate in activities that can benefit their health. Friendships and teamwork go hand in hand, and a close friendship can be an extra incentive for children and students to invest time in themselves and each other. The importance of friends is a theme that pops up over and over again, but it should not become a cliche - it can really have an impact on a young person’s health in the long-term.

Medical Advice with a Grain of Salt

Today’s blog post talks about a tricky subject. A pediatrician recently wrote an article in The Upshot for the New York Times called “The Whiplash from Ever-Changing Medical Advice.” We’re constantly swamped with new findings about food, lifestyle, gadgets, or habits that could help us or harm us, according to the medical community. The author of the article, Dr. Aaron Carroll, notes that while medical researchers need to publish their work and news organizations need to report these findings, sometimes these results have a neutral effect at best. Other times, new results could actually reverse previous research that was released only a few years ago, which may confuse the general public.

 

The eternal debate about food allergies is a good example. Recently, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease recommended that we begin giving babies peanut extract or powder in their food before they are six months old, in order to reduce the odds that they develop peanut allergies. There was substantial evidence for the effectiveness of this method, especially for children who were at risk of developing these allergies.

 

Yet back in the early 2000s, the American Academy of Pediatrics warned against giving children who were at risk of developing peanut allergies any peanut-derivative products before the age of three. In hindsight, this recommendation might have actually increased the number of children with these allergies.

 

This “medical whiplash” about conflicting advice can really exhaust readers, especially parents who are trying to make healthy decisions on behalf of their children. Dr. Carroll has written articles expressing his concerns that these recommendations, “which were not supported by strong evidence, may be doing more harm than good.”


Physicians like Dr. Carroll will be the first to agree that “simple lifestyle changes may be more influential than many medical interventions.” Interventions that work for some people might not work for others, but not all medical or news organizations will definitively admit that. It’s important to keep moderation in mind as a priority, and to be receptive but critical of the plethora of medical research that comes out every day.