Daycare

Securing a Good Start to Education

Today’s topic addresses one that may seem obvious to us, but also surprising in the United States. Children who grow up hungry in the first few years of childhood have been shown to lag behind classmates in school years later. Food insecurity, or being without reliable access to nutritious food, is a phenomenon that can be found in the United States: more than 13 million children are currently living in food-insecure homes nationwide. A recent article summarized in NPR (originally published in the journal Child Development) found that children who live in these homes before the age of five are more likely to lag behind their classmates in school socially and cognitively.

 

Also, it appears that these children don’t catch up to their peers. Researchers used data from the U.S. Department of Education from 2000 to 2006 to follow more than 10,000 children born in these households throughout their young childhood. They also interviewed the parents of these children to ask them about recent times they may have worried about food for the household. The researchers found that the younger that children were when they were exposed to food hardship, the stronger the negative effect on their performance in kindergarten (performance was measured by their ability to pay attention in class, their tendency to be hyperactive or throw tantrums, and their math and reading skills).

 

This negative effect might not be entirely attributable to the children themselves. After all, if children are hungry, then their parents are likely to be as well. The researchers affirmed that parents who are hungry can be more irritable and tired, and are less likely to engage with their children. These findings are certainly not surprising, but they confirm some important facts about early childhood and the important link between nutrition, parent interaction, and school performance. It is difficult to design interventions for very young children before they attend daycare or preschool, but the projections from this stage in life to performance in school cannot be ignored.


Food insecurity is definitely not just a foreign phenomenon, and not just an adult one. That there are millions of American children at risk of being insufficiently prepared for school should shock us all - but thanks to this kind of research, we’ll be able to lay the groundwork for erasing this gap in potential for children starting now.

Navigating Sick Days

The question of whether or not a child should stay home when they’re feeling under the weather inspires a lot of varying advice. According to an article recently published in NPR, rules in elementary schools about when to keep a sick child at home are more liberal than those in daycare centers. Also, surveyors of 1,442 parents with kids who are 6 to 18 years old found that parents had different attitudes about their children missing school based on their children’s age.

 

Some common reasons cited by parents for keeping their kids at home included: diarrhea, a single episode of vomiting or a slight fever. Interestingly, parents of older children were more likely to worry about their kids missing tests at school than parents of younger children did, suggesting that tests and exams might complicate the stay-at-home decision for parents when their children are sick. My own parents definitely also strictly adhered to the “No fever? No skipping” rule.

 

Another important factor parents consider is how contagious they perceive their children’s conditions to be. Evidence on how contagious kids can be are less definitive in older school children since they are usually not confined in a single space all day with ill classmates. For younger children who are in daycare all day, however, they may be prone to stomach bugs, ear infections, and colds than young children who stay at home.

 

Different daycare centers may also have varying suggestions for parents when it comes to children’s attendance. Some daycare facilities may have guidelines that recommend children to stay at home even though their rules don’t always align with pediatricians’ suggestions. This can be aggravating especially if parents cannot stay at home with their sick children, or cannot bring their kids with them to work.

 

Sick days are something we all experience at one point or another growing up. Since there is little uniformity about what symptoms are considered severe or contagious, it’s challenging to find or apply one suggestion to all parents or all students. Keeping an eye out for further research is probably the best thing to do as we continue to adhere to healthy behaviors such as washing our hands, staying hydrated, eating nutritious food, and getting plenty of exercise.