BMI

Weight, Language, and Self-Image

The language we use when talking to a child about their weight is very important. Doctors say that they themselves take great care in the words they choose when they talk to a child or their family member about weight and body mass index, even if their official classification falls under obesity.

 

The New York Times recently published a piece by pediatrician Dr. Perri Klass, who writes that physicians try to take care in order to avoid further hurting a child who may already be unhappy about their weight. A new policy statement jointly issued from the American Academy of Pediatrics and the Obesity society urges pediatricians to use seemingly neutral words instead of words like “overweight” and “fat.”

 

Past and ongoing research into the social and emotional effects of obesity agree that comments on weight can have a large impact on a child’s self esteem. According to Dr. Rebecca Puhl, a clinical psychologist who is one of the lead authors of the policy statement, “Weight is now one of the most frequent reasons kids are teased or bullied.” One of her studies followed more than a thousand teenagers into their early thirties, and found that children who were bullied because of weight were correlated with binge eating, poor body image, and eating to cope with emotions (not to mention other eating disorders). These correlations, in turn, were linked to obesity in adulthood as well. The effect was present for men and women, but more pronounced for women.

 

Dr. Puhl says that healthcare professionals might be some of the few allies overweight children and teenagers can have. After all, they are most likely teased by family members as well as their peers. Another ally that comes to mind is teachers - where appropriate, they can intervene in a bullying situation, as well as promote body positivity and physical activity.

 

We can all be allies if we understand and recognize that making comments about a weight does not encourage positive change; instead, making comments about weight can result in negative, longterm impacts. It is important to make sure that children and teens have access to healthy, positive influences for their physical, mental, and emotional health.

Study: Children’s Obesity Risks Increase During the Summer

This week’s topic may seem a bit funny in the weeks leading up to Thanksgiving, but it is very relevant any time of the year. 


Summer vacation is far away, but there’s reason to think about it ahead of time. A new national study (described here in the NYTimes) found evidence that obesity risks in young children are  higher when they are out of school than when they are in school. The fundamental question in debate surrounding obesity and children’s health is this: Does the cause of obesity exist primarily in school or outside of school? Recently, schools have updated their lunch menus, physical education classes ,and nutrition curriculums to reflect a growing awareness of obesity risks in  children. However, the findings of this study suggest that even with these improvements, healthy habits can be forgotten when they are not continued outside of school. 


Researchers hypothesized that if children's body mass index (BMI) grows the fastest during the school year, factors found in school environments could be a culprit for obesity risks. Conversely, they hypothesized that if BMI grows the fastest during the summer, that would mean the major risk factors could exist outside of school. They examined the weight gain of more than 18,000 children from the time they started kindergarten through when they finished second grade. The authors found that the prevalence of overweight or obese children increased between these years. A more striking finding was that the prevalence of being overweight or obese increased during summer vacation months, but did not increase during the school year. 


Intuitively, we can think of a few reasons why summertime might pose some weight control challenges for children. Children may go to sleep later and get less sleep during the summer, which could increase the risk for weight gain, according to another study in the New York Times. During summer breaks, students may also be prone to snacking and sedentary behaviors because recess and physical education classes are not scheduled into their daily routine.  Maintaining a healthy weight can be as challenging as maintaining reading and writing skills over the summer. Experts recommend that schools begin conversations with parents well before the school year ends to make plans for students’ diets and physical activity over the summer. These preemptive measures may be especially useful for students who may receive healthier meals at schools, but do not have access to nutritious food in their homes. 


Due to the holiday season, November and December is a time when young children spend more time at home with their families. Forming healthy behaviors during shorter breaks from school might help establish healthy habits that will last beyond long summer months.