The Benefits of Breastfeeding

Earlier this month at a United Nations assembly, the Trump administration’s delegate opposed a resolution encouraging breastfeeding. This has re-sparked some decades-old debates on breastfeeding versus formula and the strong arm of the baby formula industry, both in the United States and globally.

CHIL has looked to the literature on breastfeeding, which informs international maternal-child health policy like the World Health Organization and UNICEF’s recommendation of exclusive breastfeeding for the first 6 months after birth (their recommendation, of course, is directed toward women for whom breastfeeding is an option). Here’s what we’ve found:

  • A history of breastfeeding correlates with “a reduction in the risk of acute otitis media, nonspecific gastroenteritis, severe lower respiratory tract infections, atopic dermatitis, asthma, obesity, type 1 and 2 diabetes, childhood leukemia, and sudden infant death syndrome” among babies

  • The correlation between breastfeeding and reduced obesity risk carries into the child’s adulthood

  • Breastfeeding is associated with higher intelligence and cognitive ability in children

  • Mothers who breastfeed experience reduced risk of type 2 diabetes, breast, and ovarian cancer

  • Breastfeeding saves families money

Note that most of these findings show correlation, not causation, and may have confounding influences like family income or education level. Nonetheless, given all of the positive incentives for children and mothers, CHIL follows global health organizations in encouraging breastfeeding for women able to choose. For mothers unable to breastfeed, whether due to physical or lifestyle constraints, formula certainly can be a strong alternative offering convenience and variety. Be sure to discuss your feeding options with your OBGYN and/or your child’s pediatrician. Additionally, there are abundant resources online to help guide formula selection.