CHIL’s Guide to Community Health Clinics

In CHIL’s blog post last week, we mentioned Mary’s Center, a community health clinic in Washington D.C. This week, we want to emphasize that clinics like this one are available all over the nation. In fact, there are about 1,400 community health clinics (CHCs) in the U.S. While undocumented immigrants and Dreamers are ineligible to enroll in the federally-subsidized health insurance plans provided via the Affordable Care Act, CHCs often offer a good alternative for anyone seeking affordable health care—both citizens and non-citizens alike.

Additionally, these clinics do not operate under any low-income or insurance coverage eligibility requirements; that is, a family with a working parent covered by some form of health insurance is welcome at places like Mary’s Center, too. Medical costs in the United States’ largely privatized system indeed can be overwhelmingly burdensome, even for people with steady employment.

So, how do CHCs operate? What services do they provide for individuals and families, and at what cost?

CHCs are nonprofits that receive funding from a myriad of sources including federal, state, or local grants and/or Medicaid payments. Some may partially rely on private funding sources as well. Because several institutions finance each CHC, in most cases, this provides the centers with a safety net. If one funding source is compromised—something common in the U.S. as administrations shift—CHCs have other means to remain afloat.

In order to qualify for public funds, CHCs must:

  • Be located in a medically underserved area or serve medically underserved populations (determined by the federal government)

  • Provide comprehensive primary care

  • Adjust fees according to a sliding scale based on patient income

  • Be governed by a community board, of which at least 51% of members are patients of the CHC themselves

Apart from providing comprehensive primary care, CHCs may address local needs like care in foreign languages or medical translators (for which their local community board can advocate). Another example is Mary’s Center partnership with Briya Public Charter School. Briya holds classes at Mary’s Center, providing an educational space for both parents and their children. Briya’s model works well for teenage parents who otherwise may have had to forgo public education. They also offer a counseling and educational group for (future) parents to attend throughout pregnancy; a program called "centering." These two programs are particularly useful for the areas Mary’s Center serves, where there are many young families.

The localized care many CHCs provides sets them apart from other medical facilities and makes them integral to the health of thousands of children living in the U.S. today, particularly living in vulnerable and underprivileged families. If you or your kids are in need of affordable health care, CHIL recommends looking into your local CHCs for medical services. This search tool can help: https://findahealthcenter.hrsa.gov/.