Consequences of Sugar, Even Before Childhood

We often hear just how bad sugar is for your health. We also know that limiting sugars in children’s diets - in drinks and desserts, for example - is probably a good idea. Furthermore, a recent Harvard study has found that high sugar consumption (particularly fruit sugars and sugary drinks) during pregnancy might lead to increased asthma risks in their children, according to the New York Times.

 

The study builds on existing literature that links “obesity and poor [nutrition]” to “current increases in childhood asthma.” In the study, researchers tracked more than 1,000 women during their pregnancies and looked at their children’s asthma diagnoses by the time they were 3 to 7-years-old. The women who consumed the least amount of sugar in the study had 21 grams per day on average while women who consumed the most amount of sugar in the study had 46 grams per day on average. Researchers also collected data on the mothers’ education level and pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI), as well as children’s BMI and race.

 

As a result, they found that the children of women who had the most sugar were 58 percent more likely to have asthma than the children of mothers who had the least amount of sugar during pregnancy. A lead author of the study noted that the mechanisms behind this difference is still unknow; however, the idea that a mother’s diet during her pregnancy could impact her children’s health years later is very important.

 

Once a baby is born, environmental and hereditary factors may influence the baby’s future health. Yet it seems that in some respects, prenatal environment may also contribute to children’s long-term health.