Mindfulness - Something for Everyone

The timing couldn’t be better - not long after our recent post on ways to be in the present, the New York Times published a piece on “Mindfuless for Children.” The author defines mindfulness as “the simple practice of bringing a gentle, accepting attitude to the present moment,” and argues that even the youngest children can benefit from this approach.

 

The graphics in this article are beautiful and worth checking out, but we’ve condensed some of the main points here:

 

Mindfulness starts young. Even infants can notice the difference between a stressed, distracted parent and a smiling, “present” parent. Mindfulness experts say that eye contact is important to establish a connection between an infant and a parent; unfortunately, smartphones have become a huge distraction in establishing that connection. Experts recommend putting down the phone, however briefly, to interact with infants. The same goes for raising toddlers - as they start to learn to express themselves, helping them identify and describe their feelings is very important.

 

Mindfulness is important throughout childhood, from infancy to early childhood to teenage years. The appearance of mindfulness can evolve. For example, a focus on gratitude and recognizing happy moments for young children evolves to a focus on healthy interpersonal relationships in teenage years. A surprising number of diverse factors are involved in mindfulness. For example, increase in movement and activity relieves stress and improves physical health for guardians and children alike.


Mindfulness can’t be “outsourced.” People who work with children and teens to bring mindfulness into their lives emphasize the key role parents and guardians can have in contributing to children’s health. Mindfulness “isn’t like piano lessons,” where parents can simply drop off their kids to get their weekly lesson. The author of the article concedes that parenting is hard work, and often very stressful, but they are the main figures in their children’s young lives. Caregivers don’t have to be expert meditators; instead, they can focus on things like forgiveness and appreciation of the present along with their children. Having this approach will have positive mental health impacts for everyone involved.